HomeVideo: Drone Drastically Change The Way People Fishes

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An aerial drone fitted with a waterproof camera could be used by fisherman to position their bait and catch more fish.

Instead of the traditional method of casting off from a river bank or sea shore and hoping for the best, the specially-adapted drone allows anglers to fly their line, bait and weight to a prime deep-water spot.

However, some fishing purists have lamented that the technology ruins the skill and enjoyment of fishing.

The product is the brainchild of Roger Borre and his five-strong team at aerial technology company Dronexpert based in Bentelo, Netherlands.

A special waterproof camera beams back live footage of the murky depths so the angler can see if there are any fish at a location.

The user then detaches the line and flies the drone back to the bank safe in the knowledge their tackle is in the right spot.

The drone measures 18 inches (45cm) in width and weighs 4.4lbs (2 kilos). It can carry a payload of bait and a weight of 1.1lbs (500 grams).

Its makers say it is every fisherman’s friend but angling experts and fishing purists fear the technology is a way of cheating and will take away the skill element of fishing.

The product is the brainchild of Roger Borre and his five-strong team at aerial technology company Dronexpert based in Bentelo, Netherlands.

They came up with the one-of-a-kind system that allows the fishing line to be released automatically when the rig hits the bottom of the lake. 

‘This idea comes from the underwater camera-winch we made for a fish-finder bait boat,’ he said.

‘After we finished the development for the bait boat, we thought it could also be done by a drone to speed up the process.

‘With a drone you can also fly to the exact pre-programmed GPS position where the carp are feeding.’

Not all are in favour of the use of modern technology in fishing, however.

Martin Salter, national campaigns manager at the Angling Trust, said the innovation goes against the ideal of fishing set out in Izaak Walton’s 1653 book The Compleat Angler, the sport’s bible.

He said: ‘Obviously people are free to fish how the like within the rules.

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‘But some of these high tech gizmos have now taken the “contemplative man’s pursuit” of Izaak Walton – the patron saint of angling – to almost absurd levels.

‘Personally I think fishing should be about the skill of presenting a bait or lure to the fish by your own endeavour rather than by some sort of radio-controlled monstrosity.’