HomeDrone footage captures the heart-warming moment mother whale and dolphin take their calves out for a swim together

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Filmed by a drone off the east coast of Australia, the video shows the two sea creatures swimming in tandem.

It gives a fantastic perspective of the size of the whale, believed to be a humpback, as it glides through the water with its offspring.

                                                         
                                                Mother whale and dolphin swimming with their calves

The whales swim next to each other, following the trail set by the mother and baby dolphin

The whales swim next to each other, following the trail set by the mother and baby dolphin

As the mother and baby dolphins perform some twists and burst through the surface, so do the whales following behind.

The video gives the impression that the whales are intrigued by their much smaller neighbours.

And the dolphins do not appear to be phased by the giants of the sea following behind; at times they are only a matter of inches behind the tails of the dolphins.

At times when the dolphins hit through the surface, the whales seem to mimic their moves

At times when the dolphins hit through the surface, the whales seem to mimic their moves

The mother whale comes incredibly close to the dolphins in front, but the mood seems serene and relaxed

The mother whale comes incredibly close to the dolphins in front, but the mood seems serene and relaxed

The video has been shared on YouTube, with online commentators describing the footage as ‘beautiful,’ ‘magical’ and ‘amazing.’

The humpback whale can grow as long as 52 feet, and weigh as much as 79,000lbs. In comparison a bottlenose dolphin can grow to around 14ft and weigh around 1,500lbs.

Small prey such as squid, krill, herring, pollock, haddock, mackerel, capelin, salmon and various other fish forms the diet of the humpback whale.

The calves will suckle milk from their mothers until they are old enough to hunt for themselves.

Dolphins will eat herring, cod and mackerel, however the killer whale, which despite its name is actually classed a dolphin, will eat seals, sea lions and even turtles.

Commentators on YouTube, where the video has been shared, have described it as 'magical' and 'beautiful'

Commentators on YouTube, where the video has been shared, have described it as ‘magical’ and ‘beautiful’